Napoli Vintage by Libeco

Believe in Linen.

As far as linen goes, this collection of throws, pillows and floor cushions is considered a workhorse.  The fabric is sturdy and tightly woven, but it has a soft, worn in finish that gives it a slight vintage look.

Pillow Cover ONLY: stuffer sold separately. Made of 100% linen.

Unfold your linens completely before washing. Do not overload the machine. Wash your linens at max. 40°C - 104°F. Use a mild soap. Avoid chlorine bleach. If possible, line dry, it’s best for linen and the environment. If using a tumbler, iron with steam on slightly damp linen (best the inside of the fabric).

Flax has been farmed and linen fabrics woven in Flanders for centuries. By the 18th century, Meulebeke, situated near Kortrijk, had emerged as one of the villages with the largest linen production. By the 1800's, there were dozens of weaving firms operating in and around Meulebeke. Of these, only two remained: Libeco and Lagae Linens.

The first information on Libeco dates from 1864. At that time, the company was a collecting point and warehouse for pure linen fabrics produced in the homes of the cottage workforce of the region. From this first warehouse, the woven goods were transported by handcart to Kortrijk, where they were dyed and sold. By 1904, a production facility had been established and the factory had begun to install power looms; by the end of the first World War, 140 looms were in operation. Fine quality, pure linen fabrics and linen-cotton blends were produced for sheets and table coverings. Even then, exports were important to the firm, especially to South America. World War II heralded a difficult period for the company but by the early 1960's, Libeco's shareholders adopted an ambitious investment plan to ensure stability and allow the firm to grow once more.

Flax has been farmed and linen fabrics woven in Flanders for centuries. By the 18th century, Meulebeke, situated near Kortrijk, had emerged as one of the villages with the largest linen production. By the 1800's, there were dozens of weaving firms operating in and around Meulebeke. Of these, only two remained: Libeco and Lagae Linens.

The first information on Libeco dates from 1864. At that time, the company was a collecting point and warehouse for pure linen fabrics produced in the homes of the cottage workforce of the region. From this first warehouse, the woven goods were transported by handcart to Kortrijk, where they were dyed and sold. By 1904, a production facility had been established and the factory had begun to install power looms; by the end of the first World War, 140 looms were in operation. Fine quality, pure linen fabrics and linen-cotton blends were produced for sheets and table coverings. Even then, exports were important to the firm, especially to South America. World War II heralded a difficult period for the company but by the early 1960's, Libeco's shareholders adopted an ambitious investment plan to ensure stability and allow the firm to grow once more.

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